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silent witness

 
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morticia



Joined: 06 Jan 2015
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 4:14 pm    Post subject: silent witness Reply with quote

I used to enjoy this show but I find it becoming more and more unrealistic. As if a pathologist would sit and listen in on a police interview? As if a pathologist would visit a witness and then start poking around in his bedroom.

Maybe it's always been unrealistic and I'm only just starting to notice? !

Do you remember when the lead role was "Slab Woman"? Amanda Burton was one actress I really disliked. Wooden.
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essexlady



Joined: 10 Dec 2006
Posts: 348
Location: Essex

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I gave up on it several years ago. I think it's definitely past it's sell by date.
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becky sharp



Joined: 01 Dec 2008
Posts: 5917

PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't watched it for years... I think, but I'm not sure, that I stopped watching it because it was too gory...at least I think it was that programme. Question

What I don't understand about the commissioning of BBC drama is that some dramas like Silent Witness,Holby and Casualty just go on and on and on but a drama like Our Zoo (a very popular and well received programme) got just one series before it was axed with the BBC giving this reason ...

"We are very proud of Our Zoo and would like to thank all those involved. However, in order to create room for new shows and to keep increasing the range of BBC One drama we sometimes have to make hard choices and it will not be returning for a second series."

Makes no sense,whatsoever,to me Confused
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unclebuck



Joined: 19 Apr 2010
Posts: 256
Location: Warwickshire

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree with comments on lack of reality - particularly regarding role of pathologists in an investigation - they are not even bothering to try any more.
I liked the way they turned up at a firearms scene, with bodies of victims in situ (no attempt having apparently been made to give medical assistance) and just wandered around chatting - no vests, no securing the area, no suggestions that helicopter support might be advisable. It's all starting to feel a bit CBBC.

This last episode seemed to me to be based on the Beltway killings in the US (even the car looked similar), although no reference was made in the program.
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Colin



Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 916

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

becky sharp wrote:
What I don't understand about the commissioning of BBC drama is that some dramas like Silent Witness,Holby and Casualty just go on and on and on but a drama like Our Zoo (a very popular and well received programme) got just one series before it was axed with the BBC giving this reason ...


The problem is that they continue to gain audience share very quickly, and this earns them a place in the re-commissioning queue. It also depends on the relationship between commissioning editors and the indies who make the programmes. At the moment, there's a big internal debate about how the "super-indies" are getting the lion's share of the commissions and are denying the smaller producers a foot in the door. It's very difficult for smaller, newer, independent production companies to gain commissions for new ideas now whereas it's a virtual production line for the big suppliers.

The other thing is that the whole culture of commissioning has changed now in favour of the US network model; if it doesn't look like it's going to work within a few episodes it's dropped. Long gone are the days when the Head of Serial Drama or Head of Comedy would commission an idea on the basis of a lunch in the pub and then, importantly, give that idea time to mature and gain an audience over time. Imagine if today's practices were adopted back when "Dad's Army", "Steptoe & Son" or "Only Fools & Horses" were first being tried! They would have been dropped if the commissioner lost his/her bottle like they do today.

I was recently involved in a production for BBC4; you wouldn't believe the hoops that the production company went through to not only get the commission but also to get a reasonable budget - even though the commissioner constantly changed the goalposts due to the H&S and Political Correctness boxes that have to be ticked by the Producer. In the end, the production cost them much more than the fee they got from the BBC, and they're saved only by the fact that under new arrangements all the rights of the programme revert to the production company after 6 UK showings, which means that they will be able to sell to overseas markets and get a return on investment. It's very sad!
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becky sharp



Joined: 01 Dec 2008
Posts: 5917

PostPosted: Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Colin wrote:

The problem is that they continue to gain audience share very quickly, and this earns them a place in the re-commissioning queue.

Unimaginative and lazy on the part of the commissioners,in my view.
Colin wrote:
It also depends on the relationship between commissioning editors and the indies who make the programmes. At the moment, there's a big internal debate about how the "super-indies" are getting the lion's share of the commissions and are denying the smaller producers a foot in the door. It's very difficult for smaller, newer, independent production companies to gain commissions for new ideas now whereas it's a virtual production line for the big suppliers.

I think that's probably been the same for a while
Colin wrote:

The other thing is that the whole culture of commissioning has changed now in favour of the US network model; if it doesn't look like it's going to work within a few episodes it's dropped.
But as I said the programme in question was well received and had favourable reviews and it was the most watched programme in it's slot. It was one of those rare programmes where the posters on POV were near enough unanimous in their praise for it.
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